Xtreme Zone RC Race Track


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Choosing an OnRoad Class


Like offroad, onroad is split into two types of racing- Oval and Road Course. Oval racing is easier to learn how to drive, but car setup is still very critical with oval since the racing is usually closer. Road course has the illusion of looking harder, but with a little practice time turning in both directions will be no problem. Some chassis types can be used for both types of racing. Below is a list of each class divided by the type of track they're run on. Scroll down the page to read up on all of the various classes, or click on the class name to jump directly to that class's information.

BUT FIRST.. What are "Blinky" and "Boosted"?

Blinky and Boosted are the two names given to different types of brushless speed controllers. Some brushless ESCs from Tekin, LRP, Viper, Hobbywing, etc.. have software built into them that can increase the timing in a motor while the vehicle is moving around the track. This is called "boosted" or "ramping". When this feature is disabled on the speed controller, it is usually flagged by having one of the LEDs on the ESC flash, hence the term "blinky". Blinky classes restrict the use of dynamic timing, and for the most part include any sensored, brushless ESC on the market.



Oval Racing

  • Mini Sprints
  • Traxxas Kyle Busch Truck
  • Legends
  • Pan Car
  • Run What Ya Brung


  • Road Course
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  • Traxxas Ken Block Rally
  • Vintage Trans Am (VTA)
  • Stock Touring
  • Nitro Touring
  • GT8/IGT
  • Formula 1
  • World GT
  • 1/12 Scale
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  • Losi Mini Sprints
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    The mini sprint class is a mostly box-stock class based on the Losi 1/18th scale sprint cars- the Mini Slider and Mini Sprint. The only modifications allowed to the cars are changing the pinion gear up to a 19t gear, using large rear tires on both sides of the car, removing the front wing, changing the shocks to aluminum units for durability reasons, changing the turnbuckles and rod ends for durability, and the stock 1100mah NiMH battery can be replaced with an 6-cell NiMH up to 1600mah designed for small scale vehicles. The recommended replacement battery is the Duratrax 1600mah. Tuning with different shock springs, pistons, oil, shock positions, etc.. are allowed, but no other modifications such as cutting or drilling on the car are allowed.


    Pros
  • Cheap class to get into initially.
  • Restrictive rules keep the racing inexpensive.
  • This class already has a strong following.
  • RTR vehicle has everything you need to start racing right away.


  • Cons
  • Both models of Losi mini sprint cars have been discontinued, so you'll have to buy used or find a new on eBay or some other online retailers.






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    This class is based on the 1/16 Scale Traxxas Kyle Busch Truck. This is a new class, but the current rules state that no hopups can be added to the vehicle. You can tune the trucks with different shock oil, or by changing any of the suspension positions available out of the box. No drilling or cutting on the truck is allowed. You can replace the stock Kyle Busch body with the replacement clear body from Traxxas in order to customize the look of your truck


    Pros
  • Restrictive rules keep the racing inexpensive.
  • RTR vehicle has everything you need to start racing right away.




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    The legends class is a spec class built upon one of the oldest spec chassis in R/C - the RJ Speed( formerly Bolink) Legends. Legends cars consist of a durable yet simple ladder frame design with a coil spring front suspension, and no rear suspension whatsoever. Since the motor and battery combo that used to be included with the Bolink Legends is no longer being produced, racers are now using the Duratrax Photon 20t motor and any 6-cell NiMH battery. Tires are spec foams with a yellow or purple stripe designating them as spec foams.


    Pros
  • One of the most fun classes of R/C ever created, period.
  • Restrictive rules keep the racing close and inexpensive.
  • Legends have a decent following in most areas of the country.
  • Cool 1930's hotroad body styling.
  • Simple chassis design won't overwhelm a beginner with maintenance.


  • Cons
  • Only available as a kit, so you'll have to build it and provide your own electronics.
  • Lack of rear suspension can make the cars a bit of a handful to drive fast.



  • Pan Car

    Pan car is pretty much the NASCAR of R/C oval racing. These cars are flat plates of carbon fiber with independent front suspension, but a solid rear axle with a differential. They run on either foam or rubber radial tires (caps). The rules for the class consist of 13.5 brushless motors, 1-cell lipo batteries (3.7v), and non-timing speed controllers (Blinky). This class is pretty much the "anything goes" oval class when it comes to chassis modifications. Bodies must be a Nationwide Series or Car of Tomorrow style, however.


    Pros
  • Extremely fast when setup and driven correctly.
  • Limits on motors and batteries can make for close racing.
  • Can be raced pretty much anywhere in the country.


  • Cons
  • This is probably the most expensive oval class to enter and stay competitive in.
  • Very steep learning curve in regards to car setup, but can be very rewarding once you know what you're doing 



  • The name says it all. Monster trucks, buggies, pan cars, rally cars, minis.. any vehicle, any scale (within reason- we don't want a 1/5 scale running over 1/16th scales..), any power source. This class is a catch-all for any vehicle that doesn't fall into one of the other existing classes. This also gives new racers a place to learn how to drive their vehicle against other drivers. Some would consider this to be the official "Novice" class for onroad.


    Pros

  • Gives everyone a chance to try out onroad, no matter what kind of vehicle they own.
  • Great place for kids to start racing.


  • Cons

  • It's a class built around racing just for the fun of it.. what could be bad about that?